Overheating/Throttle Cutoff

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Wikked_Fool, May 30, 2018.

  1. SukhoiLover

    SukhoiLover Ace Pilot

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    I use a T6 V2, and here is what I found:

    First bind the TX and RX—binding plug in the RX “bat” slot, plane battery hooked up (blinking red light on RX), hold down on “bind range test” button (on the left lower face of the TX) and turn on TX. Light on RX should turn solid (no blinking). Turn off TX and unplug plane battery and binding plug.

    Make sure throttle is full aft (idle) and that the small toggle switch in front of the throttle (on the front side of the TX to the left of the antenna) is towards you (not away from you). You must do both throttle idle AND switch towards you. Now turn on the TX and THEN plug in the plane battery. The order is important—if you plug in the plane battery BEFORE you turn on the TX your servos will work but your throttle will not.

    Once everything is set, you will need to activate the switch (push it away from you) to engage the throttle. The switch is like a safety so you cannot turn on the TX and have the prop spin unexpectedly.

    One last “gotcha”—you may need to move the slide switch (trim) just to the right of the throttle. It is the one that move in the same direction as the throttle (forward and aft). Sometimes the throttle may want to run very slowly if this trim is too far forward—even at idle. It varies depending on the ESC/motor combination. You can’t always start with the trim switch full aft to eliminate that as a problem.

    Hope that helps. Fly safely,

    SL
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
  2. Bigron

    Bigron Rookie

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    Is it possible that you are drawing too much power for the esc. I would be curious what a wattmeter would read. Guys ar my club are always having motor issues and most of the time they are drawing 30+ amps on a 15a esc. Even thugh it appears you have everything sized reasonably correct, knowing your actuat draw may be revealing.
     
  3. Not to be sarcastic but you answered your own question , if you are constantly drawing 30A and you only have a 15A esc you are going to burn up the esc. To much prop on a motor and you burn it up. Low C rating on the battery and you have a high powered esc and motor pulling more then the battery can take and you burn it up.

    Having a watts meter plus icing on the cake is a thrust stand you can test and measure all your combinations to match the power setup., battery, esc, motor and prop.
     
    jimbosflyin likes this.
  4. Skydiver

    Skydiver Ace Pilot

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    Hi guys, I seem to remember Dave using very soft (malleable) aluminium wire and making a flat coil of it and using a wire tie to attach it to the side of the esc as a heat sync. If your esc is in a good airflow, it should take care of getting rid of the heat problem. Good contact with the esc is essential.. p.s. get a servo tester to make sure they work too.. And use a fairly large diameter wire like 1/8 inch..
     
  5. Skydiver

    Skydiver Ace Pilot

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    Hey there, even at full voltage, the 2200 kv motors will only (supposedly) draw 27 amps
    or so, but play it safe and run a 40 amp esc. I personally use transistor heat syncs and drill
    small holes for tie wraps to hold them to the esc's....
     
    FlyteTime likes this.

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