Overheating/Throttle Cutoff

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Wikked_Fool, May 30, 2018.

  1. Wikked_Fool

    Wikked_Fool Cadet

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    Hi all, I've scoured the threads and couldn't find exactly what I was looking for in terms of an answer for a setup similar to mine. I recently sent my Su-35 V5 on its maiden voyage flying with only elevons. I have all the standard equipment from the RCP master parts list, 30A ESC, 2200kv motor, 2200mah LiPo battery, and just the two servos controlling the elevons. After about 30 seconds of flight, my motor will pulse and then cut off completely, it even does so statically (while I hold the plane) it does so regardless of throttle position. What have I done wrong to cause my issues? I'm hoping it is a simple fix, I have an extra ESC that I'm going to try this coming weekend.
     
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  2. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

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    If the battery is fully charged I think it may be a faulty ESC. Try swapping it out.
    If the fault is still there it could be a faulty or broken motor lead. Check all your connections and give em a good tug to make sure you don`t have a dry solder joints
    If you have a spare motor try running that and see what happens, it could be a faulty motor also.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
  3. jimbosflyin

    jimbosflyin Top Gun

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    If your servo's are still working it might be a week battery,are you shore it's charged ?Your servo's will work on low voltage but the motor won't.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  4. Wikked_Fool

    Wikked_Fool Cadet

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    Each servo still works, in able to land the plane, and the motor will start back up after I land it and let it sit for about 30 seconds. Battery was properly balanced and charged right before I went to fly. I'm going to try switching out the ESC this weekend and buying a new motor of that doesn't work.
     
  5. I would try the esc first also. Like BB56 said it could also be bad connections, sometimes the factory soldering jobs are poor and I have had to redo their soldering jobs.

    What brand of esc and motor?
     
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  6. Wikked_Fool

    Wikked_Fool Cadet

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    I'm not 100% sure about the brand, I'll have to check on that, but I think it is a red brick ESC? And I definitely don't know about motor brand, It came from hobbyking. Do any of you have a certain brand of motors/ESC's/servo's that you like best? Does anyone make ESC's with the XT60 and bullet leads already soldered on? I had to do mine myself.
     
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  7. Usually when you go to buy them it will show or tell you if it has ends, in the same brand it can come with or without ends. Motors can be the same way also.

    Knowing the brand will sometimes help in determining what quality of part you got. All these people on this forum have years of testing and flying and have weeded out some of the parts that are just not up to snuff.
     
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  8. FlyteTime

    FlyteTime Ace Pilot

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    Probably the most commonly used motor on these parkjets is the HobbyKing Turnigy 2826 2200kv motor. I have about 10 of them and never had a problem with any of them. A good esc, also from HobbyKing is the Turnigy Plush 30A. You can't go wrong with this combo. Try to resist using the cheap Tower Pro servos on Amazon. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't. Also from HobbyKing is the Hextronics HXT900 9 gram servo. These are reliable and affordable.

    I hope you figure out your problem soon. :)
     
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  9. I do have quite a few of the HK esc and have had minimal issues with them. I do like to run a 35A or even better a 40A esc with the Turnigy 2200 kv motors.
     
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  10. SukhoiLover

    SukhoiLover Ace Pilot

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    I have to agree. I got the bright idea to try some no-name (read, "cheap") 30A ESCs from a large Asian country and had mixed luck, to include some spontaneous overheat/smoke problems, and the intermittent throttle problems you describe. If your second ESC acts up, but it is the same brand as the first, try going with another manufacturer.

    I have also found that some of the pre-soldered connectors on motors can be bad. Some of the motors have a single strand wire that can be pretty brittle. If the connectors have shrink wrap they can look fine but may have broken inside the shrink wrap; you won't see it unless you open it. I good tug should tell you all you need to know.

    Good luck and fly safely,

    SL
     
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  11. TomMonton

    TomMonton Administrator

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    The current rating in a typical esc is a little on the relative side. I had to flash up a few of "15 amp" labeled esc's last weekend and could not find the multistar 15 anyplace.

    Reading the loaded flash it is actually a 12.2 amp controller. Where did that remainder of 2.8 amps go ?

    The general rule of thumb I use is to always over-rate the specs a little to try and play within the equipments optimal comfort zone.

    If the motor/battery/prop calls for a 30amp esc I will go straight to 40amp anyway...I want that margin of buffer. If it's a hot&humid sunny day out there, your equipment can get really warm in hurry.


    Reference the ops opening post... yes.

    The esc should be the first thing you change out while trouble shooting.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
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  12. FlyteTime

    FlyteTime Ace Pilot

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    Yeah Tom, I've been getting a little puffiness on some of my batteries so I'm going to go with 40A esc's from now on.
     
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  13. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Your batteries getting puffy has really nothing to do with your ESC rating, it is an indicator you are trying to pull too many amps from your battery, discharging them too low too often, or perhaps some other reasons. Rule of thumb for battery output is amps times C rating, so in the case of a 2200 25C battery, 2.2 x 25 = 55A. Again, like the ESC, better to build in some buffer, I have found at least 25% over what your motor/prop combo is drawing normally compensates for the "ambitious" ratings of many ESC/battery manufacturers. If your batteries are coming down very warm/hot and puffy after flights, perhaps they are not capable of delivering the amps your motor/prop combo requires or you might be running them to low voltage cutoff (normally 3.3V per cell) too often.

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  14. FlyteTime

    FlyteTime Ace Pilot

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    Thanks for the explanation Scott. I can build the heck out of an airplane but when it comes to amps and load ratings, my eyes just glaze over. I really need to study more on the subject. So bottom line, I need to buy higher C rating batteries and higher rated esc's to make my batteries last longer? Most of my batteries are indeed 2200 25c. I do use a voltage alarm set to 3.7 volts so I'm not running them down too low. What's the minimum I should set my alarm to and what about storage voltage, what are the recommendation on that? I don't own a watt meter, guess it's time I invested in one. Do you have any recommendations on one for me? I bet Dave's guides that he sells on the forum would help me a bunch on this topic. I'm sure he covers the electrical aspects of the hobby in good detail? Thanks in advance for your help!
     
  15. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi FT -

    Sure thing. I spent/wasted a lot of money figuring things out early on. This video might be a bit dry, but it covers a lot of what I have learned about park jet power systems in my journey.


    I can't really tell you what Dave Power's guides or Ebooks say about the subject as I have never read them. If your voltage alarm is set to 3.7V, that is not bad, however if you are still flying for awhile just to get your plane back on the ground, you might be going below that. For longest term health of my batteries, I try to land with between 3.7-3.8V per cell. If you don't have a way to check your battery, I would strongly suggest picking up one of these so that you can check the health of your batteries regularly.
    If you find your batteries are running warm or not performing well, you can monitor the cells very quickly with this little gadget https://www.banggood.com/Wholesale-...-25733.html?rmmds=mywishlist&cur_warehouse=CN

    GT-BMON6.jpg

    I don't normally purposely put my batteries in storage mode unless I know I won't be flying for quite awhile or they are more than .1V away from storage rate of 3.8V per cell.

    Another fairly dry video of my personal thoughts and techniques for why I use the batteries I do and some things that have helped them last longer.


    An inexpensive wattmeter from Banggood https://www.banggood.com/G_T_Power-...005954.html?rmmds=mywishlist&cur_warehouse=CN

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
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  16. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Wikked_Fool -

    A lot of great answers already, you mentioned in the title about overheating, but I didn't read anything about ESC/motor heat in this post, was the ESC actually getting hot after the short period of time your motor was running?

    In my experience, behavior like this has been caused by either the throttle points not being set properly so that the ESC knows where zero throttle and 100% throttle is or cold solder joints at the motor or ESC, does it always do this regardless of the battery? Sometimes, if you just can't seem to find what is wrong, I have found the last resort is to just start over at the beginning, rebind your receiver to your transmitter, plug everything back in and see if that cleared up the problem. I can't explain why this works, but it has in the past and saved me money before replacing motors, ESCs, batteries. Best of luck :)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
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  17. FlyteTime

    FlyteTime Ace Pilot

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    I really appreciate your effort in helping me get edjumacted, lol. I value your knowledge on these subjects. Fly safe and often bud.
    Kenny
     
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  18. Wikked_Fool

    Wikked_Fool Cadet

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    So yeah, the battery, motor, and ESC all felt fairly warm upon landing and the plane would do this regardless of throttle position (above zero of course) I think I can try programming my transmitter a little differently to set the zero point differently.
     
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  19. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Wikked_Fool -

    My guess is then there is something in the wiring somewhere as others have mentioned. If you are getting heat build up in the motor/ESC and battery, there is potentially some issues with wiring, solder joints, or your motor is binding somehow and drawing considerably more amps than it should be. Most ESCs do have a temperature cuttoff as kind of a self survival circuit, so if things are acting up after a short time, as others have said, there might be some issue with the wiring. Does the motor spin fairly smoothly by hand when it is not connected? If the base of the motor is really hot when you have run it for a short period of time, it could be a bearing issue with your motor, this can be an issue with inexpensive motors which then causes the motor to draw considerably more amps to try and spin, leading to the motor/ESC and battery becoming warm very quickly.

    If perhaps you could provide some links or more info to the components you are using, that might also help us help you.

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
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  20. trying2fly

    trying2fly Top Gun

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    Same happened to me once and it was the ESC. Another ESC and mine worked fine! chas
     
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