NEW 2017 F-18 V5 Official Thread

Discussion in 'Scratchbuilding!' started by RCPowers, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. Hot!! Very nice job... that will stand out in air extremely well!
     
  2. SukhoiLover

    SukhoiLover Ace Pilot

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    Wow--that's a pretty airplane!
     
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  3. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Brian -

    Thank you so much for the interest in my videos and your very kind feedback, humbling and appreciated:)

    There are certain motors that are well suited to swinging a 3 bladed prop for improved power, the DYS 2208/7 2600 Kv motor I have in my F-18 V5 is one of them. I am using a Master Airscrew 6x4x3 prop which also works very well with the most popular size park jet motor, the 2826/6 2200 Kv like RC Powers recommends on their parts list.

    Sometimes just a change in prop can improve or change the performance of a power system giving you either more thrust, more efficiency or sometimes a good combination of both. There is lots of very detailed info on motor and prop testing that members have contributed in the Parkjet motor bench testing thread, I have also attached the latest edition of a testing spreadsheet I have been maintaining for the last few years that covers quite a few of the most popular park jet motor setups.

    There is a lot of stuff to sift through there, I know, but lots of details for those who like that kind of thing:rolleyes: I wrote this Power Systems Summary thread on our NAMC blog that summarizes the results of considerable bench and field testing of many of the popular park jet motors, how well they work with some of the more popular props along with recommendations for what size ESCs and batteries to use to help your power system run safely while achieving the performance you seek.

    A beautiful paint job on your F-18 V5, good luck on your maiden flight and thanks again for the kind words:)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     

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    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
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  4. Shannon

    Shannon Administrator

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  5. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Everyone -

    I had this little steed out for another "thrash and dash" session today:)
    2017-04-03 10.08.26.jpg
    Over 20 flights on this plane now, really have it dialed in the way I like it, it is such a quick, agile plane, so much fun:)

    I did experiment a bit with flaps (actually flaperons) today to see how slow I could comfortably fly around with the added lift they provide and to see how much I could shorten my landing approach.

    I am happy to report I am very impressed with how this plane handles with flaps. I started off with about 3/8" deflection, increasing in very small increments until I got to about 5/8" which I found to be just a bit too much, it started to become a bit unstable and less predictable, so I backed off just a bit and found that just between 1/2" and 5/8" somewhere was ideal.
    2017-04-03 10.08.40.jpg
    I have the flaps set up to deploy fairly slowly, about 2 seconds from the time I flip the switch until they are down which is a good thing as with them deployed, the plane does want to drop the nose quite a bit. Having them deploy slowly helps keep the plane a bit more stable without abrupt changes to the air flow and gives me time to start feeding in a little elevator to compensate. I took it up high and deployed the flaps and while hands off, it was about 30 degrees nose down right away. However, because it is so responsive in the pitch, it requires very little elevator to hold the nose level.

    I could fly around comfortably with about 10% less throttle than I could "clean" (no flaps) and using gentle rudder inputs had good solid control. I would say I was flying at about 30% throttle with the flaps deployed.

    On landing approach, I would deploy the flaps, then cut the throttle at the same altitude as I normally do and it literally cut the landing approach in half and with good elevator management, it would touch down very gently. Very cool:cool:

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
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  6. EricR

    EricR Ace Pilot

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    Great looking plane design. I love your paint job too! I'm torn between yours and Gjvoice's paint job :D
     
  7. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Eric -

    Thanks very kindly, this new F-18 V5 is really a little sports car of a park jet for me thus far, just a blast to fly.:)

    Often the paint scheme is the hardest part of the build for me to decide as well, I have sometimes changed my ideas two or three times from initial cutting of foam to actually paintingo_O

    That is the beauty of scratch building these foam park jets for me, folks can have the liberty to paint any way they want to suit their needs and to help them keep track of the plane in the sky:)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
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  8. Gjvoice

    Gjvoice Rookie

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  9. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Brian -

    Now that you have your F-18 V5 painted, I would just see how it goes, sanding it now might make a mess of that beautiful paint scheme:oops:

    I do sand all of my planes, the nose, canopy, leading and trailing edges of the wings, prop slot, elevons, vertical stabilizers and rudders as well as along the front and bottom of the nacelles. It serves a bit of form and function, it does tend to make the plane look a little sleeker, I have found on average that a good sanding job reduces the overall weight of the plane in the neighborhood of about a 1/2 oz/14 gr.

    Where the real benefit comes in is the reduction in drag I have noticed, the plane just feels slipperier, smoother and more responsive in the air and comparing sanded to unsanded awhile back, about a 5-10% increase in speed. Even if you don't really worry about going fast, if the plane is moving through the air with that much more efficiency, you can fly around with a little less power which I think is always a good thing.

    To get that taper on the edges, perhaps practice a bit on some scrap foam. I like to get it tapered, but not so fine that every time I touch it, the foam crumbles or gets dented.

    It can be a bit messy, I try to do it outside whenever I can. I will sand a lot of the leading and trailing edges before I assemble the full air frame, it is easier to sand those edges when the pieces are flat. In the case of the F-18 V5, I also did most of the sanding on the fuselage and canopy before I mated it to the wing plate.

    Even if you are going to sand it outside, I would recommend wearing some sort of mask to prevent breathing in the foam dust, it can be quite irritating and I'm sure toxic if you inhale enough of it over time:eek:. I just use this kind, I get from the Dollar store and it works great.
    2017-02-26 08.05.49.jpg
    I start with about 150 grit sandpaper, being gentle to ensure I don't rip the foam, which is why it might be good to practice on some scrap until you get the pressure right. Any coarser sandpaper and I found I was left with big grooves in the foam which kind of defeats the purpose:confused: I have also sometimes finished off with some 220 grit for an extra smooth finish on the nose/canopy.

    Then after sanding, I just use the little brush attachment on the vacuum cleaner and vacuum off the dust, I know others give the foam a bit of a rinse off as well. Sanding creates a static charge and lots of the dust will stick to the foam making it more difficult to glue and paint later.

    Hope that helps, good luck:)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
  10. Gjvoice

    Gjvoice Rookie

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    I should be able to carefully sand the wings and elevons, verticals my prove to be challenging though. I have the time while I try to put together funds for power and controls. (Carefully spending without triggering an audit from spousal unit)
    Also, I really appreciate your great willingness to answer even the most simple question. It really helps keep people coming back to know they aren't going to be chastised for their lack of knowledge.
    Bravo Scott!
     
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  11. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Thanks Brian!:) No worries, so many people helped me along the way, I could never repay them all. I don't have all the answers, but I continue to learn with each new build and plane and if my experience is helpful to one person, I'm very satisfied with that. It gives me a great opportunity to try and pay back/pay forward to the community and hobby that has given me so much joy and satisfaction.

    We have all been where you are starting off in foam park jets and I know it can be very bewildering, like "drinking from a fire hose" at times:eek:

    The cool thing is as you go along, learning and experimenting, you will find your own way of doing things that suits your building and flying style. That to me is one of the greatest parts of scratch building, as you learn to build and set up your planes to maximize your enjoyment, you truly start to turn a corner so to speak in my experience. Amazing how much fun and satisfaction one can have with some inexpensive foam, glue and inexpensive parts, this aspect of the hobby has a very high "fun to dollar ratio" for me, tons of fun for very little money spent.

    Look forward to seeing your F-18 V5 ready to fly:cool:

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
  12. Fz1Fazer

    Fz1Fazer Ace Pilot

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    Hi Scott,
    why do not mix a little elevator to the flaps to be on the safe side.
    Cheers,
    Andreas
     
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  13. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Andreas -

    I'll give it some thought for experimenting the next time out, thanks for the tip:)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
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  14. XDmToter

    XDmToter Ace Pilot

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    Sorry I'm late to reply here. But I wanted to put in my $0.02.

    The difference between Clockwise versus Counterclockwise has become confused with the popularity of Multirotors.

    On your common Tractor configuration Airplane, where the pilot would be looking at the prop out in front of them, Clockwise rotation would be as you view the motor from the Back/Bottom.

    However, The Multirotor guys judge the rotation of the motor while viewing it from the Top. So in this case Clockwise is the opposite.

    If the motor you are looking at is telling you clockwise or counterclockwise, this is most likely from the Multirotor perspective of viewing the motor from the Top. If the motor does not tell you if it is CW or CCW, then it is most likely the more common airplane style motor.

    This really only tells you which way the threads on the shaft are configured. Airplane motors have always had right handed threads, so when the motor spins (in tractor configuration) , the resistance of the prop causes the prop nut to tighten. If you run them backwards (which is what we are doing with our prop-in-slot parkjets), the prop nut may spin itself off if it is not on tight enough.

    You can change the rotation of any brushless motor by reversing two of the power leads. It is perfectly fine to build a multirotor with all CCW motors, but two of the prop nuts will self tighten, and the other two will not. The multirotor guys got sick of two of their props coming loose all the time when they bumped into walls, so the manufacturers answered by putting left handed threads on the motor and calling them CW motors. That way, they can use CW motors in two corners, and CCW motors in the other two corners, and all 4 props will self tighten.

    Based on all that; If you want your motor and prop on your prop-in-slot parkjet to be self tightening, then you want a CCW (normal) motor and a Pusher prop, or a CW motor and a Standard prop.

    It doesn't really matter if you use a CW or CCW motor, and a Pusher or Standard prop, as long as you are aware of a few simple facts.


    1. Make sure the prop is installed correctly so that the numbers are toward the front of the plane.

    2. Make sure the motor spins the correct direction. If it's turning the wrong way, reverse two of the power leads.

    3. Make sure your prop nut is good and tight.



    Follow those three rules, and it won't matter if your motor is CW or CCW or if your prop is Standard or Pusher.
     
  15. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    Hi Everyone -

    Much more "tinkering with planes" weather lately than flying, so I decided to increase the "cool" :cool: factor on my F-18 V5 with some missile rails.
    2017-04-10 08.40.26.jpg
    I looked at some pictures of the F-18 and figured out roughly how long they would have to be to have the scale size, they are about bang on 6"/15 cm long. I just used a strip of scrap Depron and a strip of scrap paperless DTF to get the width to what looks right:) A little bit of sanding to get them shaped and I'm good to go.

    Another tip now that I have about two dozen flights on this plane. The nose only sits about 3/8" clear of the ground when the plane is sitting on the nacelles, so on landing, it is regularly sliding along the ground. It might be a bit tough to see in this picture, but it has dirt and grass stains all along the nose. When I was building it, I figured this might happen, so I spread a very thin layer of glue along the bottom up to the front of the LERX. Thus far it has protected the foam really well and prevented any tearing or gouging as it slides to a stop. Just some food for thought depending on what surface you might land on:)
    2017-04-10 08.43.38.jpg
    Cheers,

    Scott
     
  16. Shannon

    Shannon Administrator

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    Well that's a great idea!
     
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  17. Well said. :)
     
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  18. Gjvoice

    Gjvoice Rookie

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    What if you used clear packing tape? Weight and aerodynamics shouldn't be affected by such a small area, right?
     
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  19. e3_Scott

    e3_Scott Top Gun

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    That would work very well also, just something to protect the foam from getting too chewed up depending on the landing surface:)

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
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  20. XDmToter

    XDmToter Ace Pilot

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    Packing tape works well for this purpose on unpainted foam. However; in my experience, packing tape won't stick to painted foam, and paint won't stick to packing tape.

    I'm going to try Scott's technique sometime, as I believe it will result in a Paintable and scratch resistant surface.
     
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