Antonov AN2

Discussion in 'Scratchbuilding!' started by quorneng, Dec 20, 2018.

  1. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    Slowly moving forward
    The elevator servo and tail wheel.
    EleServo1.JPG
    The tail wheel itself and its mount inside the fuselage are printed as is the stop to limit how far is rotates!
    At the moment the AN2 will be flown bank and yank with a fixed rudder so no servo required although there is plenty of room to add one if it proves necessary.
     
    andy_downs, Wildthing and Sterling101 like this.
  2. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    Slowly moving forward.
    The tail wheel, tail plane and fin go on.
    TailFin1.JPG
    The tail plane is hollow wit 2mm depron skins and is braced.
    TailBrace.JPG
    The brace is 3mm Depron but has a rounded balsa leading and trailing edge.
    The fin will be fixed.
     
  3. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

    Posts:
    8,753
    Likes:
    19,740
    Points:
    133
    I`m rather surprised you are not fitting an active rudder.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
    andy_downs, hwilton and Wildthing like this.
  4. Very slick :)
     
    andy_downs likes this.
  5. hwilton

    hwilton Airman

    Posts:
    158
    Likes:
    178
    Points:
    43
    You don't have to use active rudder in flight, but easier to fit it now.
    'Bank and Yank' NBG when in taxi and in ground effect?
     
    andy_downs likes this.
  6. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    The field I normally fly from is to say the least pretty rough so taxiing is not really an option and where a take off is possible it has to be so quick and directly into wind that the rudder is not really required.

    On planes like my hand launch/belly land Bombardier Q400 (the avatar) which does indeed have a rudder but it is rarely used other than for directional fine trimming.
    It works for me.
     
    Sterling101, andy_downs and Wildthing like this.
  7. rodrigo

    rodrigo Top Gun

    Posts:
    2,081
    Likes:
    340
    Points:
    103
    Beautiful work, it’s look better and better.
    Rudder or not rudder that is the question!...
    I like rudders (even on twin motors) because I am used to it, but here are some point to check if you need active rudder:
    - allow hammerhead maneuver and others aerobatics...
    -if you want to land realistic in a road ore something similar, rudder improve the success %.
    -if you need (or like) use lot of flap to land, banking isn’t the best choice to turn. Flat and slow turn could be accomplish only with a good rudder
    -if you like or has the condition to taxing
    -if you had the conditions to take off from the ground but has limited track width. Add crossed wind and rudder could be necessary
    -if you plan put floats on your mono motor and enter to the lovable worlds of the floatplanes. Rudder on water are desirable but aerodynamic rudder are a good choice for easier lands (again flat turns) and the only way to recover the plane from the water if you don’t want to swim.

    Just my personal opinion. Always depends of your personal choice , weight of the plane , wing load and airfield conditions.

    Again congrats for your amazing work
     
  8. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    The ESC with it deep fins installed.
    ESCfins.JPG
    The ESC allowed a very low power test (nothing glued in!) with the motor and prop in position.

    The tail - with its fixed rudder!
    TailFin2.JPG
    Just waiting for delivery of some 26 AWG servo wire to extend the elevator servo before the base of the fin can be completed.
     
  9. mastermalpass086

    mastermalpass086 Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    196
    Likes:
    593
    Points:
    93
    This is looking awesome! You're building the way I hope to in the future. Definitely going to be keeping an eye on your methods for detachable wings. A Bristol Blenheim sits as part of my learning journey up to the Dehavilland Mosquito, and such a plane is going to need detachable wings in order to fit in my car.

    The next project I'm founding the designs for right now, is a Hurricane Mk IID /Trop, which I am also planning to do the same detachable wings - popping off the sides rather than coming off as one, to practice and learn for the Blenheim's design.

    Please cover your wing mounting process in detail when you get to it! :p
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
    Sterling101, Wildthing and andy_downs like this.
  10. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    mastermalpass086
    At the moment my intention is to assemble my AN2 as a "one piece" plane as I can just get it in my car, so although the both wings will be built as individual left and right sections they will be permanently fixed and rely entirely on the rigging wires for rigidity.

    As it is a biplane it would be possible to copy the full size and simply 'pin joint' the wings and struts together so it could all be disassembled although it would add some complexity and weight to achieve.
    In this picture of an AN2 fuselage you can see just how tiny the wing fixings are!
    Wingmounts.jpg
    And this is a 5 ton plane!
     
  11. For simplicity and strength (plus being lazy) I went for the one piece wing :D
     
  12. mastermalpass086

    mastermalpass086 Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    196
    Likes:
    593
    Points:
    93
    Ah I see! Still, the design process can be educational for me, as you've already got a part of the wing built that the rest of the wings are due to be attached to.

    upload_2019-1-12_11-50-45.png upload_2019-1-12_11-51-14.png

    How you go about doing that might give me some ideas. :p
     
  13. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    mastermalpass086
    The AN2 is a fully rigged biplane.
    SimpleFront.jpg
    This means that the wires provide all the bending stiffness. The wing at the root sees no bending just tension on the lower wing joint and compression on the top one, hence the simple 'pin' joints on the full size. The only bending the wing see is in the area between the fuselage and the wing strut and the bit of the wing that sticks out beyond the strut. The hollow foam wings on my AN2 will have sufficient stiffness to handle these forces.
    As it will have fully functioning rigging the lower wing can be simply glued to fuselage wing stub as it only has to resist a tension force in flight. A glue joint is pretty good at resisting a straight pull outwards.
    The same applies to the top wing which although built as one piece will also have limited bending strength but will be well able to handle the compression forces.
    Of course if flying inverted these tension and compression forces are reversed! ;)

    Without functioning rigging the wings would have to be built very differently, and be heavier, with a strong spar included to provide the required bending stiffness.
     
  14. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

    Posts:
    8,753
    Likes:
    19,740
    Points:
    133
    As the AN2 will have bracings to support it wings, the detachable cantilever wing design for the Hurricane would have to been different.
    I would go for a box spar or tubular spar for the center section and have a male spar on the wing panels to slot into it. This could be made of carbon or aluminium tube but the ends of the carbon female spar would need to be whipped like a fishing rod to prevent it splitting.
    You would also want a stub spar to prevent the main spar twisting.
     
  15. mastermalpass086

    mastermalpass086 Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    196
    Likes:
    593
    Points:
    93
    I did NOT think of using aluminium, that's a damn good shout! What came to mind was 4mm Ply boards, attached to the plywood core of the plane, sticking out as males, and a pair of 4mm Boards in the wing to serve as the females (for each strut, so four in total). One of the struts would house Nylon nuts and bolts while the other just reinforced it:

    upload_2019-1-12_18-23-53.png

    The front strut being 10mm thick is too narrow to house a screw, but damn. Strength for weight? This method is probably very flawed considering G-loads, and the sanding affect the boards will have on each other over time. You just saved me constructing a nightmare haha! I'll pop into Homebase on Monday - they have a selection aluminium rods of all kinds there - see which pipes will slot into each other best, and suss out a fastening system from there. Thanks a million! :)
     
    andy_downs likes this.
  16. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

    Posts:
    8,753
    Likes:
    19,740
    Points:
    133
    Where you are making your wings detachable are where the Hurricane had dihedral, you could incorporate the dihedral with bent piano wire and aluminium tubes. Some old timers used brass boxes and hack saw blades. It depends on how big your planes is. Neodymium magnets might hold the wings together.
    In the old days we used this method for building sailplanes. You need a bit of old technology.
    A model shop would have the piano wire and tubes that should fit properly.
     
  17. solentlife

    solentlife Cadet

    Posts:
    47
    Likes:
    54
    Points:
    18
    Hi Q .... didn't realise you were here as well !!

    We have 2 AN2's in the hangar at Cirava if you ever need any photos / dimensions.

    [​IMG]

    Nigel
     
    andy_downs and Wildthing like this.
  18. mastermalpass086

    mastermalpass086 Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    196
    Likes:
    593
    Points:
    93
    A useful thing I've noticed about the Hurricane in particular is the dihedral doesn't go right to the fuselage - the wings come out flat to the landing gear hinge:

    upload_2019-1-12_20-55-43.png

    I think this will allow an easy set up for the mounting, whereby the tubes on the fuselage can be one piece for both sides, attached flat to the deck of the plywood core. On the other hand, having one of the tubes bend up and into the dihedral would give the whole air frame a lot more strength.
     
    Wildthing and andy_downs like this.
  19. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    613
    Likes:
    1,443
    Points:
    93
    A bit off topic but it was done like that for purely practical reasons as it meant it could sit on its undercarriage with the outer wing panels removed.
     
    Wildthing and mastermalpass086 like this.
  20. mastermalpass086

    mastermalpass086 Ace Pilot

    Posts:
    196
    Likes:
    593
    Points:
    93
    Not really - this is YOUR thread I've appear to have hijacked to figure out my wing mounts. ;)
     
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Scratchbuilding! Antonov AN-2 Biplane Design Dec 3, 2018
Scratchbuilding! Antonov 225 Apr 14, 2010

Share This Page

string(1) "1"