3D Printed Parts

Discussion in 'Scratchbuilding!' started by Sterling101, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. Sterling101

    Sterling101 Top Gun

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    Quick test of the blue transparent filament I've got with the new hot end. Not bad I don't think!

    IMG_20180117_192452_038.jpg
     
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  2. It looks pretty. :)
     
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  3. Sterling101

    Sterling101 Top Gun

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    It's actually a Hawk canopy. Won't fit my Hawk as it's canopy fitting is custom shaped by my own fair hand but it does look nice :D
     
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  4. TomMonton

    TomMonton Administrator

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    Wow... very clean walls Mr. Sterling.

    Seriously that is nicely done.
     
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  5. So I then ask are you building a plane around the canopy then???? ;) :D :D
     
  6. Sterling101

    Sterling101 Top Gun

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    Just testing for now... ;)
     
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  7. TomMonton

    TomMonton Administrator

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    I made a neat little gizmo add-on yesterday just for grins and to satisfy my curiosity. It's a simple depth gauge clipped onto the fan shroud to help better level the print bed.

    Warm up the bed and wait for 60°c.

    Code was set to first find your fixed height in the front left corner using a slip of paper, playing card or your reference of choice.

    Pause and beep lift the head and move it in slightly at 3mm above the plate to set zero on the dial gauge. The dial gauge will now reach the glass plate.... pause, beep, lift and place the head back down again as a double check.

    Now go forward moving corner to corner in that same pattern, placing the head at 3mm, pause, beep, double check and moving on to each corner and finishing in the center.

    G28 Z0 = set reference
    G1 Z25 = install/remove gauge
    G1 Z15 = lift/ travel height
    G1 Z3 = gauge point

    Corners were set to X+/-10 and same for Y. This was intended so the corners landed in a more comfortable area rather than the far end of the glass.... and avoid those stupid paper clips. That may be my next print too btw, better bed clips.

    I had to put the SD card back into the controller so I could run this directly in front of the machine so all I lost was my backup card ...eh.

    It really works pretty slick. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2018
  8. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

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    Neat:)
     
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  9. That's cool. Curiosity would say after you leveled the bed hot is to now measure it cold and compare readings.
     
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  10. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

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    A bit further with my concept of 'printed parts' where the object is to only use 3D printing where the requirement for accuracy or repeat ability justifies the penalty of its weight.
    As part of a lightweight Depron airliner project I needed to create a scale RR Trent engine nacelle that contained an 100W quad motor driving a 4 blade 3x3 (76 mm) prop and just like the full size the whole nacelle has to be hung on a pylon ahead of the wing.
    The motor mount and pylon will be relatively highly stressed so can justify being made from a single but complex printed part.
    MtrPylon1.JPG
    Basically a hollow structure with a 0.3 mm wall thickness and carefully positioned 4% infill to provide rigidity.
    The smooth inner surface of a printed part is obviously beneficial to the airflow so the inlet duct is a simple printed 0.3 mm wall thickness cylinder. 4 printed formers and an inlet ring not only provide stiffness to the duct but also generate the outer profile of the nacelle.
    76Parts.JPG
    POR actually glues PLA very well.
    The complete 'printed part' of the nacelle glued together.
    PrintCmplt.JPG
    It weighs 27.2 g.
    The outer skin of the nacelle is planked in 2 mm Depron.
    76Nacelle5.jpg
    One major benefit of printing components like this is that the second nacelle only requires the press of a button to create (well almost) and it will be exactly the same!
    So far so good but there is still some way to go before it actually flies!
     
  11. I really like how you are using a mix of materials here. Neat! with all the materials we use like foam, balsa, aluminum, CF, etc., thin printed parts like these come is very handy for scale looks. nice job!
     
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  12. SukhoiLover

    SukhoiLover Ace Pilot

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    Long thread, and I just got here, so I skipped to the end. But . . . has anyone tried the acetone vapor bath to smooth out the surfaces?
    And I completely agree with Malukk. The mix of material on the Quorneng nacelle seems inspired. Nice work!
     
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  13. Acetone vapor bath would only work if you are printing with ABS. It doesnt work with PLA
     
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  14. SukhoiLover

    SukhoiLover Ace Pilot

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    Ack! Thanks.
     
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  15. I finally went ahead and bought the buildtak system. 20% off was a nice deal. I am loving it so far! Thanks for the advise on this Sterling!
    I have begun the printing of zivko edge finally so we’ll see how that goes.

    I will be printing the landing gear with polycoarbonate (PC) filament.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

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    That looks wonderful Malukk:)
     
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  17. quorneng

    quorneng Ace Pilot

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    It has not flown yet, it really needs almost ideal conditions, but the composite Depron/printed parts Airbus A350-900 is now virtually complete.
    Complete1.JPG
    Technically not an EDF as it uses ducted props.
    76Nacelle3.JPG
    But when does a multi blade prop become a fan?
    58" (1480 mm) span. It weighs 21 oz (595 g) including a 1000 mAh 4s.
    With the fuselage formers, the nacelles, inner wing ribs and other reinforcements there are just over 50 individual printed components in the air frame.
     
  18. So far I am loving it. The pieces comes off better when the bed is warm but you also have a good chance of warping your piece doing so especially the thin lightweight pieces so be careful that way. Some of my thin pieces I have printed I let the bed totally cool down before I attempt to get them off, definitely sticks really good and I have no corners warping up anymore.
     
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  19. bogusbandit56

    bogusbandit56 Top Gun

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    That my friend is a work of art:)
     
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  20. She’s beautiful! Looking forward for the maiden when you are ready and count me in if you plan on releasing plans...
     
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